Faceted Gemstones with Rare and Unusual Inclusions

Gemstones are admired for their beauty and rarity, but those containing unique inclusions often stand out as particularly fascinating. Each gemstone showcases the incredible variety of natural formations and the intricate ways in which elements like iron, manganese, chromium, silver, and antimony contribute to their striking colors and inclusions. These inclusions turn what might otherwise be considered imperfections into features that add significant value and interest, making these gemstones highly prized among collectors and gem enthusiasts. Understanding the origins of these colors and inclusions deepens our fascination with these remarkable gemstones, highlighting the complexity and wonder of Earth’s geological artistry.

Here, we explore some of the most intriguing faceted gemstones with rare and unusual inclusions, highlighting their significance and the stories they tell.

Rutilated Quartz: Rutilated quartz contains needle-like inclusions of rutile, a titanium dioxide mineral. These inclusions can appear in colors like golden, red, and silver, forming patterns ranging from sparse threads to dense networks. Each gemstone’s unique appearance is defined by the orientation and density of these rutile inclusions. Rutile inclusions form under specific conditions of temperature and pressure, offering insights into the geological processes during the quartz’s formation. High-quality rutilated quartz is primarily sourced from Brazil and Madagascar.

Moss Agate: Moss agate is a form of chalcedony containing green mineral inclusions that resemble moss or plant-like structures.The green inclusions in moss agate are typically manganese or iron oxides, forming intricate patterns that look like landscapes, trees, or moss, giving each gemstone a distinct and natural beauty. Moss agate forms from silica deposition in water rich in these oxides. The patterns reflect the dynamic environmental conditions of the hydrothermal processes that created them, often found in volcanic areas such as India and Brazil.

Phantom Quartz: Phantom quartz contains ghostly outlines of other crystals within it.These “phantoms” form when a crystal undergoes an interruption in growth, allowing another mineral to deposit on its surface before quartz growth resumes, resulting in the appearance of a crystal within a crystal. Phantom quartz inclusions provide a historical record of the crystal’s growth, indicating changes in environmental conditions such as temperature and mineral saturation. Notable sources include Arkansas, Brazil, and Madagascar.

Lepidocrocite in Quartz: Lepidocrocite in quartz features needle-like or flaky inclusions of lepidocrocite, an iron oxide hydroxide mineral. Inclusions range from reddish-brown to deep red, creating striking visual effects within clear quartz. These inclusions often form beautiful, feathery patterns. Lepidocrocite inclusions indicate the presence of iron-rich fluids during quartz formation, primarily found in Brazil and Madagascar, providing valuable information about the local geological environment.

Clinohumite: Clinohumite is a rare gemstone with vibrant red to orange-red inclusions. These inclusions, often composed of iron and chromium, create striking patterns that enhance the gemstone’s appearance.Clinohumite forms under specific conditions of temperature and pressure, often in contact with metamorphic rocks and skarns. Significant sources include the Pamir Mountains in Tajikistan and the Taymyr Peninsula in Russia.

Tugtupite: Tugtupite is a rare beryllium aluminum tectosilicate mineral known for its red to pink coloration. Tugtupite can exhibit fluorescent properties, glowing bright red under UV light, adding to its unique appeal. Tugtupite forms in alkaline igneous rocks, particularly in the Ilímaussaq complex in Greenland and the Kola Peninsula in Russia. Its rarity and striking color make it highly prized.

Pyrargyrite:Pyrargyrite is a silver antimony sulfide mineral known for its deep red to dark red color. The mineral’s dark red color and metallic luster make it a unique and desirable specimen for collectors. Pyrargyrite typically forms in hydrothermal veins associated with silver deposits, found in places like Mexico, Germany, and the United States.

Trillion

Quartz with Copper & Chrysocolla

Polygon

Quartz with Hollandite Madagascar

Star Inclusion 

Hexagon

Quartz with Hollandite Brazil

Hexagon

Quartz with Ankerite

Hexagon

Quartz with Cookeite

Oval

Quartz with Hedenbergite

Cushion

Quartz Fire

Trillion

Quartz with Clinochlorite

Hexagon

Quartz with Pyrite

Square

Quartz with Siderophyllite

Bagette

Quartz with Piemontite

Bagette

Quartz with Rutile

Polygon

Quartz with Hematite

Bagette

Quartz with Rutile

Polygon

Quartz with Almandine Garnet

Polygon

Quartz Rose with Diopside

Hexagon

Quartz with Hessonite Garnet

Bagette

Black Garnet in Rosolite Pink Grossular Garnet

Polygon

Quartz with Xenotime

Bagette

Ludwigite with Peridot

Bagette

Quartz Dendritic

Polygon

Vorobyevite with Tourmaline

Quartz with Cookeite

Bagette

Aquamaine – Hessonite Garnet – Biotite & Columbite

Polygon

Quartz + Lithiophilite & Chlinochlorite

Hexagon

Quartz with Petroleum

Bagette

Quartz with Fluorite Crystal

Polygon

Hematoid Quartz – Amethyst – Goethite

Hexagon

Quartz with Lithiophillite

A cushion cut purple amethyst gemstone.

Amethyst with Hollandite

Polygon

Pink Fire with Covellite

Hexagon

Iolite with Hematite

Polygon

Citrine Quartz with Anhydrite

A pink sapphire, valued at $100 or more, is being held by a pair of pliers.

Zoisite In Quartz

Hexagon

Quartz with Epidote